Golf Tips: Hitting a Slice or Draw shot

While playing golf, we often find ourselves in a situation where there is a tree or any other obstacle between our ball and the green, and we have to play a draw or slice shot to save a stroke count avoiding a layup shot. In this situation, we have to hit a specific golf shot, for example, slice or draw shot, sometimes also referred to as fade or hook shots, respectively. Both of these shots are daring and risky but can be best rewarding when one learns this art and master those strokes. These steps will guide and open the entry to new achievements in shot-making.

Before clarifying the slice and draw, Let’s learn how to hit a straight shot because draw and fade shots will be derived from the straight one.

Hitting a Straight Shot 

  1. Remain behind the ball and imagine a straight line between the ball and the target.
  2. Choose a leaf or anything that is a couple of feet ahead of your ball, and imagine it as your objective line.
  3. Address the ball, pointing the clubface at the leaf you chose. (This is the place which gives you a primary preferred position. The top plane of each iron, wood, and putter is planned with an arrangement control corresponding to the ground and in the specific course of the clubface.)
  4. Adjust your heels, hips, and shoulders corresponding to the objective line. You’re now well-positioned to hit the ball directly at the objective.

This is how we hit a straight shot, and from this stance, we will learn how to hit a fade and draw. Make sure to wear a quality cabretta golf glove and a store in in a golf humidor.

The most effective method to hit a fade: 

Set up your stance for a straight shot, as mentioned above.

Rather than adjusting your heels, hips, and shoulders corresponding to the objective line, adjust them left of your objective (for right-hand golf player). Keep the clubhead and arrangement bar pointed along the first objective line.

Swing normally, along your body line (not the objective line). At that point, the ball should begin left of the objective, and then will fade to one side, around the target.

The most effective method to hit a draw: Complete stages 1, 2, and 3 for a straight shot.

Rather than adjusting your heels, hips, and shoulders corresponding to the objective line, adjust them right of your objective (for right-gave golf player). Keep the clubhead and arrangement bar pointed along the first objective line.

Swing normally, along your body line (not the objective line). The ball should begin right of the objective, at that point, attract to one side, at the target.

That’s all to hit a draw or fade. Initially, One needs to keep practice to hit these shots because a little mistake and you can land in a deep rough, or your ball can go in some unplayable area.